Home Life Trends Alston’s Woolly Mouse Opossum Facts And Info

Alston’s Woolly Mouse Opossum Facts And Info

Alston’s Woolly Mouse Opossum facts and knowledge. Learn fast facts about Alston’s Woolly Mouse Opossum in food regimen, habitat, prey, copy, and so on. in our animals facts archive.

TAXONOMY

Caluromys alstoni (J. A. Allen, 1900), Cartago, Costa Rica.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

French: Souris-opossum laineuse d’Alston; Spanish: Zorricí.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Length 6.7–7.9 in (17–20 cm); weight 2–5.three oz (60–150 g). One of the most important mouse opossums. The dorsal hair is yellowish brown to reddish; underparts are paler. Distinct black masks over every eye. The tail is lengthy, slender, and bare. There isn't any marsupium. The toes have strongly opposable thumbs.

DISTRIBUTION

Caribbean coast of Central America from Belize to Panama and into Colombia, and likewise in some Caribbean coastal islands.

HABITAT

Inhabits lowland tropical moist forest and cloud forest under 5,250 ft (1,600 m), and likewise areas of secondary forest.

BEHAVIOR

Nocturnal and solitary. Primarily strikes in tree canopies and from department to department, however will also be discovered sometimes on the bottom.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Polygamous. Feeds on bugs, eggs, fruit, and small vertebrates. Attacks its prey by greedy it with its fingers and making use of a sequence of fast bites all around the physique of the prey. Then it's consumed from the top down. Legs and wings of bugs are discarded.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Polygamous. Females construct spherical nests with vegetation and particles. After a brief gestation of lower than two weeks, the younger are born in a really undeveloped state. Births have been reported virtually in each month of the 12 months. Litter measurement varies from two to about 14 younger.

CONSERVATION STATUS

The IUCN categorized this species as Lower Risk/Near Threatened. Severe deforestation in Central America is probably going having a robust adverse influence on this and different species of the area, though it has been present in some protected areas in Costa Rica.