TAXONOMY

Ovis canadensis Shaw, 1804, Mountains on Bow River, Alberta, Canada.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

French: Mouflon d’Amerique; German: Dickhornschaf; Spanish: Carnero de la Canada, borrego cimarron.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Head and physique size is 60–77 in (153–195 cm) in males and 49–60 in (124–153 cm) in females. Maximum weights are 300 lb (137 kg) in males and 200 lb (91 kg) in females, however often 160–211 lb (73–96 kg) and 105–154 lb (48–70 kg), respectively. Males have huge horns curling spherical and ahead. Color ranges from reddish brown to very darkish brown. Undersides, again of legs, rump patch, and muzzle are white.

DISTRIBUTION

Mountains of western North America south to desert ranges of the southwest United States and northern Mexico. Former vary was extra in depth.

HABITAT

Mountains, foothills, badlands, with cliffs for escape.

BEHAVIOR

Live in small teams of two to 9, with grownup males often separate.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Eat a variety of grasses, herbs, and shrubs.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Polygamous. Mating takes place in autumn and gestation lasts about 174 days. Females first mate aged two and a half years, males not often earlier than ages seven or eight. Males set up dominance prior to the rut by displaying and head clashing.

CONSERVATION STATUS

May have numbered one to two million in the course of the nineteenth century, however a lot decrease than that now. Numbers general are steady and the species is assessed as Lower Risk/Conservation Dependent. O. c. weemsi is Critically endangered, O. c. cremnobates is Endangered, and O. c. mexicana is Vulnerable.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS

Hunted for meat and trophies.

Tagged: