TAXONOMY

Hippocamelus bisulcus (Molina, 1782), Chilean Andes.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Huemul, Chilean guemal; French: Cerf de andes méridionales, huémul des andes méridionales; Spanish: Ciervo andino meridional, huemul.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Small. Shoulder top: 31–35 in (77–90 cm); physique size: 55–65 in (140–165 cm); tail size: 4.5–5.5 in (11–13 cm); weight: 100–145 lb (45–65 kg). Coat coloration of each ####es yearlong is monotonous, yellowish grizzly brown with whitish stomach, a black Y-shaped stripe on muzzle, and a brown spot on rump. Bucks develop small two-pointed antlers. Both bucks and does have elongated canines, coated by a lip.

DISTRIBUTION

The Andes of central and southern Chile and Argentina.

HABITAT

Inhabit thick woods and bushes at altitudes 4,300–5,600 ft (1,300–1,700 m), on steep slopes, in rugged aid.

BEHAVIOR

Linked to fixed residence ranges to 90–200 ac (36–82 ha). Buck and grownup does stay collectively, generally in a small group of eight, comprising a buck and does. In rut, buck marks vary by butting bushes, thus dispersing secretion of head scent glands. A buck defends does from rivals.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Grass eater, feeding on cereals and sedges.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Polygynous. Rut in winter (July–August). Gestation is eight months. Fawns seem on the finish of wet season February–April. Fawns keep hidden.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Now thought-about Endangered. Recently, deer inhabited excessive altitude plateaus in Andes. Hunting stress, competitors with cattle, and pursuit by wild canines decreased inhabitants numbers to 1,300 animals residing in some localities in southern Chile and Argentina.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS

Game species up to now, now preserved as uncommon species.


Find More About: