OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Long-neck turtle; French: Chélidés; German: Schlangenhalsschildkröten.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

This is a medium-sized (to 10 in [25 cm] carapace size), long-neck species. The oval shell is brown and has a shallow central groove which may be pronounced in some specimens. The vast, cream-colored plastron has a darkish sample that follows the seams of the scutes. In distinction to the vast shell, the neck is comparatively skinny and the small head is distinctly pointed.

DISTRIBUTION

Eastern Australia from Adelaide, South Australia, to Victoria, New South Wales, and Queensland.

HABITAT

This species prefers slow-moving backwaters, particularly weedy lagoons, swamps, and billabongs. It might sometimes be discovered within the swift currents of streams and rivers.

BEHAVIOR

When the seasonal wetlands dry up, this species is understood to make lengthy overland migrations to the closest water gap or to estivate terrestrially. It might lie dormant for parts of the summer time and winter in shallow burrows beneath vegetation. However, in some areas the snakeneck turtle has been noticed to hibernate communally in aquatic websites. This species emits a foul-smelling musk from the inguinal and axillary glands which can serve to deter would-be predators.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

This species is an opportunistic carnivore, principally feeding on aquatic invertebrates, fish, tadpoles, and crustaceans. It might also feed upon terrestrial bugs and carrion if out there.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

In the temperate portion of its vary, mating has been noticed in April and May. Nesting happens from late September to December. The feminine deposits eight to 24 brittle-shelled, elongate eggs (up to 1.three in [34 mm] in size and 0.eight in [20 mm] vast) in nests constructed close to the water’s edge. A diapause or embryo estivation happens throughout growth; due to this fact, incubation might take up to 185 days, though 120 to 150 days are extra traditional. The noticed intercourse ratio of the ensuing hatchlings is impartial of incubation temperature.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not threatened. This species remains to be fairly frequent.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS

Although many snakenecks are consumed by Aborigines, this “smelly” snakeneck turtle is usually averted.


Find More About: