Daikoku  (DaikokuTen) is one of the Shichi Fukujin, or the Seven Gods of Happiness (or good luck), in common Japanese perception. He is taken into account a bringer of wealth, patron of farmers, and protector of the soil. Daikoku wears the golden solar on his chest and holds a mallet that may grant needs.

A buddy of kids, he is called “the Great Black One.” A fats and affluent man, he seems in artwork along with his mallet, baggage of rice, and generally jewels. Ebisu is his son.
Placing Daikoku’s image in a kitchen is alleged to deliver good luck and prosperity, making certain that there'll at all times be nutritious food to eat. Members of the Tendai Buddhist sect venerate him because the protector of their monasteries.

While Daikoku is a well-liked determine, there's some confusion about his origin. Some sources state that Daikoku is an historic Shinto god added to the Buddhist pantheon. Others say he's the Japanese equal of the Buddhist god referred to as Mahāokāla in India.

Probably as a result of their names are related, Daikotuten and the Shinto god Daikoku-Sama—often known as Okuninushi—turned what scholar Genichi Kato referred to as “dual gods.” Their identities turned fused and tough to separate in tales and the favored creativeness. This is one instance of the way in which Buddhist and Shinto myths and legends turned intertwined.