OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Water bat; French: Vespertilion de Daubenton; German: Wasserfledermaus; Spanish: Murcielago ribereño.

TAXONOMY

Myotis daubentonii Kuhl, 1817, Hanau, Hessen, Germany.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Adults vary from 1.8 to 2.2 in (4.5–5.5 cm) in size, 0.25–0.42 oz (7–12 g) in weight, and 1.3–1.6 in (3.4–4.1 cm) in forearm size. Medium-sized brown bat with lighter ventral fur.

DISTRIBUTION

Eurasia.

HABITAT

Riparian areas, typically close to woods.

BEHAVIOR

In addition to mother-and-young maternal roosts, grownup women and men could roost collectively throughout the summer season. Roosts are normally underground tunnels, cellars, and caves. They hibernate within the winter in related underground places, however stay fairly lively, leaving the hibernaculum continuously.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Often feeds in flight, capturing bugs over water. Also recognized to often take a small fish.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Species most certainly promiscuous. Mating generally happens within the fall and winter, with delayed fertilization. Young are born in early summer season. Litter measurement is usually one. The younger are weaned by two months of age.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not threatened.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS

May assist management pest insect populations.

Tagged: