TAXONOMY

Dendrohyearax validus True, 1890, Mt. Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. Two subspecies have been described: D. v. validus on the continent and D. v. neumanni on the islands of Pemba, Zanzibar and Tumbatu.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Tree dassie; French: Daman d’arbre; German: Baumschliefer; Spanish: Daman de árbol; Kiswahili: Perere.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Head and physique size 12.5–24 in (32–60 cm); weight 1.7–4.Zero kg (3.7–8.Zero lb). Males and females are roughly the identical measurement. Coat is lengthy, smooth and really darkish brown, dorsal spot mild to darkish yellow, from 0.8 to 1.6 in (20–40 mm) lengthy. One pair of inguinal mammae. Longevity unknown.

DISTRIBUTION

Kilimanjaro, Mt. Meru, Usambara, Zanzibar, Pemba, and the relict forests of the Kenyan coast.

HABITAT

Evergreen forests up to about 11,500 ft (3,500 m). On the Kenyan coast they dwell within the fossil reef space.

BEHAVIOR

Tree hyearaxes are nocturnal and dwell primarily solitary however teams of two and three may be discovered (probably mom and subadult younger). Population densities within the Kilimanjaro varies 7–23 animals/2.5 acres (1 ha).

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

herbivorous, looking leaves, buds, twigs, fruits from forbs and bushes all year spherical.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Not recognized. Gestation: 220–240 days; one to two younger per feminine.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS

African tribes hunt hyearaxes as a supply of food. In the Kilimanjaro space, they're hunted extensively for his or her skins, which have industrial worth.


Find More About: