TAXONOMY
Equus zebra Linnaeus, 1758, Paardeburg close to Malmesbury, southwest Cape Province, South Africa.

OTHER COMMON NAMES
English: Cape mountain zebra, Hartmann’s mountain zebra; French: Zebre de montagne; German: Bergezebra.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS
Body size 102 in (260 cm); shoulder peak 59.1 in (150 cm); weight 750 lb (340 kg). Is a medium-sized, long-legged, hoofed with a brief coat that's striped black and white with wider stripes on the rump and a white stomach. A dewlap provides a particular look. The mane is erect, and likewise striped. The muzzle is tan to darkish grey between the nostrils and on the lips.

DISTRIBUTION
Occurs in small relict populations in Cape Province of South Africa. The largest populations happen within the Mountain Zebra National Park and the Karoo National Park. The Hartmann’s mountain zebra happens in small numbers in northwestern South Africa. The primary inhabitants is in Namibia and occupies most of its historic vary.

HABITAT
Live in semiarid mountainous grassland and shrubland. During the warmer months, Cape mountain zebra use the extra open grasslands, and transfer to the ravine and wooded hills within the chilly months.

BEHAVIOR
Has secure household (harem) teams composed of 1 male and one to 5 females and their offspring. Bachelor males are normally lower than 5 years of age and journey in much less secure teams. In the Mountain Zebra National Park household teams have overlapping dwelling ranges.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET
Very selective of their grazing, e.g., extra leaf than stalk. However, when forage high quality decreases, they will feed on higherfiber, extra senescent grasses. They will even feed on browse when grass availability declines.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY
Polygamous. Polyestrous, and age at puberty might vary 13–30 months. Males usually don't attain harem male standing till they're 5 years outdated. Gestation is about 12 months.

CONSERVATION STATUS
Endangered, due to small inhabitants dimension. Major threats are fragmented and small populations, droughts and diminished entry to water and forage, and interbreeding between the 2 subspecies.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS
They are a strikingly stunning animal and are an vital ecological element of their grassland and shrubland ecosystems. In Namibia, they're used for meat and the sale of skins.