TAXONOMY

Bos moschatus (Zimmerman, 1780), between Seal and Churchill Rivers, Manitoba, Canada.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

French: Boeuf musqué; German: Moschusochs; Spanish: Buey amizclero.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Massive construct with comparatively brief legs and a slight hump. Height is 47–59 in (120–150 cm). Maximum weight can attain 836 lb (380 kg). Coat is darkish brown and coarse, with a dense, gentle underfur. Both ####es have horns which might be broad and curve down and out.

DISTRIBUTION

Formerly occurred by northern Alaska, Canada, and Greenland into northern Eurasia. May have survived in northern Siberia till 3,000–4,000 years in the past. Exterminated from Alaska and elements of Canada in the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, however conservation measures and reintroductions have restored them to a part of this unique vary. Also launched to west Greenland, Wrangel Island, and the Taimyear Peninsula in Arctic Russia, and southern Norway.

HABITAT

Tundra. Prefers moist habitats equivalent to lakesides, valley bottoms, and moist meadows in summer season. In winter, transfer to open slopes, ridges, and summits the place winds stop accumulation of snow.

BEHAVIOR

Gregarious, residing in herds of up to 100, although often 10–20. When threatened, they bunch collectively in a good circle, going through outward, with calves within the heart.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

In summer season, they feed on grasses and sedges and, in winter, browse on shrubs and dwarf willow.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Polygamous. The rut takes place June–September. Males show and battle with head-on conflict. Dominant bulls drive different males away. Young are born mid-April–mid-June.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not threatened. Populations now steady or rising. Estimated to quantity roughly 120,000 in 1997.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS

Hunted for its meat and conceal. Inuit people used its horns to make bows and its mild, heat underfur qiviut for clothes.

Tagged: