TAXONOMY
Antilope megaceros (Fitzinger, 1855), Sobat River, Bahr-elGhazal, Sudan. Monotypic.

OTHER COMMON NAMES
English: Mrs. Gray’s lechwe; French: Cobe leche du Nil; German: Nile litschi; Spanish: Lechwe de Nilo.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS
Body size 4.5–5.5 ft (135–165 cm); shoulder top 2.6–3.5 ft (80–105 cm); tail 18–20 in (45–50 cm); 132–264 lb (60–120kg); horns 18–35 in (45–87 cm) lengthy. Males have chocolate brown coat with white shoulder patches; females’ coat is uniformly rufous in colour.

DISTRIBUTION
Most wild populations happen within the Sudd ecosystem of southern Sudan. Smaller populations within the Machar marshes of the higher Nile close to Ethiopia and in Ethiopia (Gambella National Park).

HABITAT
Almost solely in floodplains, freshwater marshes, and swamps.

BEHAVIOR
Expert waders and swimmers, they transfer in leaps by water too shallow to swim by. One male could management a harem herd of 50 or extra females. Males could utter squeaky grunts when combating, which they typically do in water. Females give toad-like croaks when on the transfer.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET
Eats grasses and water crops.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY
Polygynous. Gestation interval 7–eight months; younger weaned after 4 months. Females ####ually mature 1.5 years, males at 2.5 years. Lifespan at the least 10 years.

CONSERVATION STATUS
Lower Risk/Near Threatened. The wild inhabitants is estimated at 30,000–40,000 animals (nearly 95% of these within the Sudd), and is doubtlessly jeopardized by water improvement initiatives that cut back their habitat. The remoteness of the Sudd protects them from most types of industrial or trophy searching.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS
Hunted the place populations are accessible to people.


Find More About: