Home Life Trends Noctule Facts

Noctule Facts

TAXONOMY

Nyctalus noctula (Schreber, 1774), France. Seven subspecies.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

French: Noctule; German: Abendsegler; Spanish: Nóctulo común.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

A medium-sized bat with yellowish to darkish brown dorsal fur and barely lighter-colored fur ventrally. Body size ranges from 2.6 to 3.2 in (6.5 to 8.2 cm), weight from about 0.53 to 1.23 oz (15 to 35 g), and forearm size from 1.9 to 2.Three in (4.7 to 5.Eight cm).

DISTRIBUTION

Throughout Europe and far of temperate Asia, maybe as far south as Singapore.

HABITAT

Forests and fields, usually close to water.

BEHAVIOR

They migrate—typically greater than 400 mi (670 km) and probably a lot farther—to winter hibernation websites in caves, tree hollows, and constructing crevices. Hundreds might hibernate collectively. They ceaselessly awaken through the winter and go away the hibernaculum in the hunt for food. After the spring migration, teams might briefly roost collectively in buildings, ceaselessly emitting screeching trills which are audible to people. The teams disperse, and people separate to roost in small tree hollows and rock crevices. Males grow to be territorial throughout breeding season, and release pheromones to appeal to females.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Fly over open areas, foraging for winged bugs, together with moths and beetles.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Mating generally happens each in early fall and within the spring; most certainly polygynous. Delayed fertilization follows early mating, in order that just one litter is produced in late spring to early summer season. Gestation lasts 50–70 days. Litter measurement ranges from one to three altricial younger per feminine, though three is uncommon. Weaned at six weeks of delivery, the younger attain full measurement at about two months previous. Females might attain ####ual maturity as early as three months of age, however most females and males don't grow to be ####ually lively till the next 12 months.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not listed by the IUCN, nonetheless, habitat destruction seems to be lowering their numbers.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS

Assist in controlling pest insect populations.