Home Life Trends Rufous spiny bandicoot Facts

Rufous spiny bandicoot Facts

TAXONOMY
Perameles rufescens (Peters and Doria, 1875), Kei Islands, Indonesia.

OTHER COMMON NAMES
English: Long-nosed echymipera, spiny bandicoot, rufescent
bandicoot; German: Dickkopf-Stachelnasenbeutler; Spanish; Echimipera Narizona.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS
Head and physique size is 11.8–16.1 in (300–410 mm); weight is 17.6–70.5 oz (500–2,000 g). Very elongate snout. Red-brownblack coarse, spiny dorsal fur, white ventrally. Short, nearly bare black tail.

DISTRIBUTION
Subspecies E. r. rufescens is discovered within the lowlands of northern, jap, and southern New Guinea, Aru Islands, and Kei Islands. E. r. australis is confined to Cape York, Australia.

HABITAT
In New Guinea is discovered solely beneath 3,940 ft (1,200 m). Prefers rainforest however tolerates disturbed areas and grasslands. Australian subspecies happens in closed forest together with mesophyll vine forest, notophyll vine forest, and gallery forest, but additionally is present in eucalypt grassy woodland, coastal closed heath, and low layered open forest.

BEHAVIOR
Nocturnal. Possibly makes use of burrows relatively than nests for daytime shelter, at the least in New Guinea.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET
Omnivorous, though prefers to eat bugs.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY
In New Guinea, pouch younger have been recorded between March and October, however in Australia breeding could also be extra seasonal, with an estrus within the dry season. Possibly has decrease fertility than seen in different species of the genus. Litter sizes from one to three are reported. Probably promiscuous.

CONSERVATION STATUS
Generally unusual, however could also be domestically plentiful in New Guinea; widespread in its restricted vary on Cape York, Australia.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS
Eaten by indigenous people in New Guinea.