OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Northern Australian snapping turtle, northwest snapping turtle.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

This is a medium to massive (up to 13 in [34 cm] most carapace size) sideneck turtle. The crown of the pinnacle has a outstanding scale and the thick neck is roofed with tough tubercles. The nuchal scute is absent. The posterior rim of the carapace is deeply serrated in juveniles; nonetheless, it might turn into comparatively clean in adults.

DISTRIBUTION

This largely tropical species is discovered all through the Victoria River and close by drainages of Western Australia and the Northern Territory.

HABITAT

Rivers, fast-moving creeks, and flooded forests of tropical Australia.

BEHAVIOR

Adults, particularly the bigger females, are robust swimmers. Cloacal respiration is nicely developed on this species. In fastmoving currents the adults could not often floor.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

These turtles are largely herbivorous, consuming bark, fruits, pandanus roots, and the seeds and blossoms of flowering crops discovered alongside riverbanks.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

In the Daly River nesting happens in February and March. At least one clutch of 10 brittle-shelled eggs is laid every season. The elongate eggs (2 x 1 in [51 x 28 mm]) hatch after 120 days.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not threatened. Although this species shouldn't be on the IUCN Red List, its populations in a number of river drainages have been negatively affected by air pollution.


Find More About: