eBuzz Nigeria

What is Aphrodite in Greek Mythology?

In Greek mythology, Aphrodite is the goddess of affection, magnificence, and lust.
There are differing accounts of how the goddess Aphrodite got here to be. The Greek poet Hesiod wrote that Aphrodite was born out of violence. In the primal days, quickly after creation, Uranus, the daddy of the early gods, was castrated by Cronos, his son. The genitals fell into the ocean, and from that unlikely mating Aphrodite was born, rising up out of the aphros, or sea foam. The poet Homer was the first to name her the daughter of Zeus, the chief of the Greek gods, and the mortal girl Dione.

When Zeus realized the great thing about his daughter, he was afraid that the gods would fight over her. He married Aphrodite to the
smith god, Hephaestus, since Hephaestus was the calmest and most reliable of the gods. Unfortunately, Hephaestus was additionally lame and normally coated with soot. Although he crafted his spouse fantastically labored jewellery, he couldn't hold her trustworthy to him, and Aphrodite had amorous affairs with many gods and mortals. Among these have been the god of conflict, Ares, and the mortal Adonis, who died tragically when he was gored by a boar.One of Aphrodite’s sons was Eros, who served as her messenger. Eros is higher identified in the West by his Roman title, Cupid. Aphrodite’s Roman title is Venus, and her competition, the Aphrodisiac, was celebrated in numerous facilities of Greece and particularly in Athens and Corinth.

There are sturdy hyperlinks between Aphrodite and the older goddesses of the traditional Near East, Ishtar, Inanna, and Astarte, who have been worshipped in what is now Iraq and Syearia. All three of these have been goddesses of each love and conflict, and Aphrodite is the lover of the god of conflict. The love story of Aphrodite and Adonis is very shut to the older Babylonian love story of Ishtar and Tammuz and to the even earlier Sumerian story of Inanna and Dumuzi, together with the hero’s dying from wounds inflicted by a boar.

Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on Linkedin

Search More of: ,

« | »




Recent Posts


Pages